Groundhog Day In Higher Education

“It’s nice … People like it.” –Rita (Andie McDowel) “People like blood sausage too… People are morons.”  -Phil Connors (Bill Murray) We wake up, day after day and year after year, to the same higher education. The world is changing at light speed — there were no Snap Chats, iPhones, or Teslas a decade ago – but on-campus higher education just stays the same. Continue reading at:  https://unitedmintcampus.com/groundhog-day-in-higher-education/

The Role of a Brick-and-Mortar Global Campus in an Unbundled World

Brick-and-Mortar is in a crisis. That’s not big news. It has already been in a crisis for a decade. Amazon has been kicking retail Brick-and-Mortar butt. The digital revolution is changing how we consume most things. Many are proclaiming: Brick-and-mortar is dead! Long live digital! Not so fast. Book stores and electronics stores may be in trouble, but I wouldn’t write off all brick-and-mortar. In fact, some trends are pointing towards the very non-trivial value consumers put on the brick-and-mortar experience. For example, on-site experiential marketing spends are growing annually across most corporate sectors. And…

what we talk about when we talk about global higher ed

THE BIG IDEA As part of my for-profit, make-a-living activities, I have been involved in developing a global experiential education city (www.intlcampus.com pw:turnkey). Over the past few years, the project has grown both in scale and in ambition. Its generation looks something like this: You have probably noticed echoes of this journey in my blog, via ruminations on the multi-directional campus, flipped campus, experiential study abroad, etc. Two years of hard work later, I am more excited about this project than ever. Our global experiential education city will host branch campuses of universities from (almost) every continent….

Best Idea of 2015: Flipped Campus

PART 2: FLIPPED CAMPUS Assumption (from Part 1): Technology improvements will create an online classroom experience that is better than the on-campus classroom experience. If online classroom experience is better than on-campus classroom experience, then WHY WALK TO CLASS? The Status Quo In a recent conversation about the future of higher ed, a university administrator pointed out to me that universities are building new dorms left and right, and many colleges’ applications are up. He felt secure that the classic four-year liberal arts model will sustain itself for quite some time. It’s hard to disagree. Generations of…

Top 33 Global Higher Education Resources

Finding global higher education resources – case studies, market research, policy white papers – can be a challenge. If you are looking to dig into this broad and complex topic, I hope that this list will save you many days of searching. It is a result of several years of combing the internet for the most insightful materials on global higher ed, while doing research for my book on a global university concept. A big THANK YOU to all those on the list. Your visionary work has laid a foundation for the most important conversations in…

The ENGAGEMENT Gap

We know all about the skills gap… what about the engagement gap?   I was recently reading the Op-Ed in the New York Times about saving the lecture called Lecture Me. Really. Reading the article, one would think that the lecture is really an endangered species. Well, I don’t believe that. Really. As part of my market research, I talk to a lot of students. And the students are still saying the same thing – there’s too much lecture, too much abstraction, and not enough engagement. These conversations made me wonder if the discussion about outcomes and…

My response to the The Atlantic article on the Minerva Project

It is easy to get excited about the Minerva Project. Finally a story about courageous and extreme innovation in higher ed – an actual reinvention of the liberal arts experience (read article here).  First, the biggest turn ons: Challenging, engaging and highly-interactive curriculum Considering the four years of summer camp that is much of liberal arts education today (I’m not just basing it on my own experience – the average college student studies only 14 hours per week), it is refreshing to see a rigorous curriculum that is actually interested in engaging and challenging students. It…

Things one finds on Wikipedia, while recovering from Achilles tendon surgery.

” Early mechanical systems[edit] Skinner teaching machine 08 The possibility of intelligent machines have been discussed for centuries. Blaise Pascal created the first calculating machine capable of mathematical functions in the 17th century simply called Pascal’s Calculator. At this time the mathematician and philosopher Leibniz envisioned machines capable of reasoning and applying rules of logic to settle disputes (Buchanan, 2006).[2] These early works contributed to the development of the computer and future applications. The concept of intelligent machines for instructional use date back as early as 1924, when Sidney Pressey of Ohio State University created…

How Universities Categorize Per Student(FTE) Costs. Thanks @collegemeasures. #highered #budgets

While sifting through http://collegemeasures.org/, I came across how universities categorize their per student (FTE) costs. Great if you’re looking to build a higher education budget. Instruction Costs A functional expense category that includes expenses of the colleges, schools, departments, and other instructional divisions of the institution and expenses for departmental research and public service that are not separately budgeted. Includes general academic instruction, occupational and vocational instruction, community education, preparatory and adult basic education, and regular, special, and extension sessions. Also includes expenses for both credit and non-credit activities. Excludes expenses for academic administration where the…