what we talk about when we talk about global higher ed

THE BIG IDEA As part of my for-profit, make-a-living activities, I have been involved in developing a global experiential education city (www.intlcampus.com pw:turnkey). Over the past few years, the project has grown both in scale and in ambition. Its generation looks something like this: You have probably noticed echoes of this journey in my blog, via ruminations on the multi-directional campus, flipped campus, experiential study abroad, etc. Two years of hard work later, I am more excited about this project than ever. Our global experiential education city will host branch campuses of universities from (almost) every continent….

My response to the The Atlantic article on the Minerva Project

It is easy to get excited about the Minerva Project. Finally a story about courageous and extreme innovation in higher ed – an actual reinvention of the liberal arts experience (read article here).  First, the biggest turn ons: Challenging, engaging and highly-interactive curriculum Considering the four years of summer camp that is much of liberal arts education today (I’m not just basing it on my own experience – the average college student studies only 14 hours per week), it is refreshing to see a rigorous curriculum that is actually interested in engaging and challenging students. It…

Dual and Joint Degrees – Yay or Nay?

Just read an excellent article in Inside Higher Ed by Elizabeth Redden on the increasingly common phenomenon of international dual and joint degrees (Read here).  Here are some of my thoughts on the topic: Dual and joint cross-continental degrees are usually a result of partnering universities in different countries that agree on a set of qualifications, curricula, requirements, etc. For example, a student can graduate with a US bachelor’s degree in business and a European degree in engineering, giving the student a significant edge in the job market, both at home and abroad. Though some accreditation…

Global Demand for American Higher Education is Totally Inelastic

During 2008-2009, the worst years of the global economic crisis, when the sub-prime mortgage collapse became a fiscal meltdown and sent the global economy reeling, how did the public/private university sector fare? According to Moody’s, one of the two largest global credit rating agencies, during this fiscally brutal time “universities demonstrate a countercyclical ability to increase student enrollments during recessions… and offer long term potential for increasing revenue diversity”. Even the non-premium for-profit education sector showed considerable strength through the recession. Historically, international student enrollment growth trends in U.S. universities have powered through any and…

What is the global demand for American higher education? Everybody Wants It! I dare you to prove me wrong.

Let us broadly define demand for premium international education by the globally mobile post-secondary student base, which is now more than four million and projected to grow to more than eight million in the next ten years. These are students who can afford to leave their country of origin in search of premium options. What percentage of this group “demands” a U.S. education? What percentage wants it? These are moot questions. It’s a question of ninety-nine percent or ninety-five percent — not thirty, fifty or seventy percent. They all want the best.  There are some…